The Point System

We are going through a weird time in Denmark. The new administration has indicated that they would like to remove and streamline the immigration process. One thing they  would like to simplify is the Point System. This means that a lot of people believe that the system has already been taken down. Such is spin.

The point system for family reunification of spouses (as of now)

You need 60 points if you/your partner are older than 24.

You need 120 points if you/your partner are younger than 24.

You need to pass a Danish language and culture test. Your Danish needs to be at “A1” level.

Work Experience: Max 80 points

You can obtain 40 points if you have had ordinary full-time employment for at least 2.5 years out of the past three years, either in or outside Denmark.

If you are a paid employee, you must be paid according to a collective bargaining agreement, or your salary and employment conditions must correspond to Danish standards.

You can obtain 60 points if you have had highly qualified employment outside Denmark for at least 2.5 years out of the past three years.

You can obtain 80 points if you have worked in Denmark for at least two years, and have held a residence permit under:

  • the Danish Aliens Act, section 9a(2)(iv) (residence permit under the Corporate scheme). Read more about the Corporate scheme
  • the Danish Aliens Act, section 9a(2)(vi) (residence permit based on professional or labour market considerations). Read more about salaried work

You can also obtain 80 points if you have worked in Denmark for at least two years in a job listed on the Positive List.

You can also obtain 80 points if you have worked in Denmark for at least two years in a job with a gross annual pay of no less than DKK 375,000.

Language Skills: Max 50 points

You can obtain 40 points if you can document that you possess either English, German, French or Spanish language skills at a level equivalent to the Danish test ‘Studieprøven’ (C1 level).

You can obtain 50 points if you can document that you possess either Danish, Swedish or Norwegian language skills at a level equivalent to the Danish test ‘Studieprøven’ (C1 level).

If your mother tongue is either Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, English, German, French or Spanish, documentation of your language skills could be documentation that you have completed preliminary education in your country, which gives access to further education, such as education equivalent to high school level (Danish ‘gymnasium’).

Completed Education: Max 100 points

You can obtain 40 points for an education completed outside Denmark which is on the same level as a Danish vocational upper secondary degree of no less than two years and six months, a business academy degree, a professional bachelor’s degree, or an equivalent degree.

You can obtain 50 points for a vocational upper secondary degree of no less than two years and six months, a business academy degree, a professional bachelor’s degree, or an equivalent degree completed in Denmark.

You can obtain 50 points for having completed a Bachelor’s degree or an equivalent degree at a university outside Denmark.

You can obtain 70 points for having completed a Bachelor’s degree or an equivalent degree at a university in Denmark or at a university which is recognised as being among the 50 best universities in the world.

You can obtain 80 points for having completed a Master’s or PhD degree at a university outside Denmark which is on the same level as a Danish Master’s or PhD degree, or an equivalent degree.

You can obtain 100 points for having completed a Master’s or PhD degree or an equivalent degree at a university in Denmark or at a university which is recognised as being among the 50 best universities in the world.

Author’s note: They have to say “at a university in Denmark or at one of the Top 50 World Universities” because no Danish University made the Top 50. To say they are flattering themselves, puts it mildly.

Supplementary Criteria: Max 20 points

You can obtain 20 points if you can document that you possess either English, German, French or Spanish language skills at a level equivalent to, or higher than, the Danish test ‘Prøve i Dansk 2’ (B1-B2 level).

You can also obtain 20 points if you can document that you possess Danish language skills at a level equivalent to, or higher than, the Danish test ‘Prøve i Dansk 2’ (B1-B2 level).

You can obtain 20 points if you can document that you are not living in a marginalised housing area (ghetto).

You can obtain 10 points if you can document that you have participated actively in voluntary work in a global humanitarian organisation for at least one year.

It is a requirement that the organisation is based on democratic values, and that your participation has been voluntary, that is, unpaid. Furthermore, you must have participated actively in the organisation. Simply being a member or donating money will not suffice. The Danish Immigration Service will assess each case individually to decide if you meet the requirements for active participation.

Looking at the current point system is an exercise in balancing despair and hilarity.

The way they rate their mediocre universities on par with the Ivy League and Russell Group: Hilarious.

The way they rate a handful of European languages above any of those from another continent. You would think they would rate Mandarin at the very least, given that they want it to be taught in schools: Despair.

The way they don’t rate some school systems for being able to teach English, given the uneven quality of the folkeskole provision, even in countries where the official language IS English: Despair.

Case Study

Kate Mullings has been living in Denmark for seven years. Her husband is Danish. She has an 20 month old infant. She had residency denied and she was asked to leave the country.

This was because her “English is not good enough”. I expect, since the official language in her country is English and she completed preliminary education there; she thought it was okay to claim “Language skills”. She was not exaggerating about her English level, after she submitted her application, she earned a “10” (a “B” grade) at a Danish business school for English.

When she asked for time to sort out a visa for her infant, the Danish authorities told her that she did not need to take the child, did she? All heart.

“Luckily”, she is allowed to stay while the appeal goes on. And if I know the Danish system they will say “Aww bless, you did eventually get an English qualification in the Danish Way, we’ll let you stay! ” but not change the rule that coming from a country where the official language is English and finishing school there is not good enough. Can anyone guess what “undocumented English skills” is code for? Would it help if I said she originally comes from Ghana?

Read more:-

Deportation case for having bad English

Insane deportation case because of insane foreigner policy legacy

12 thoughts on “The Point System

  1. Maybe because they thought in Ghana you speak Ooga Booga. It can’t be true that black people of Africa are taught in English, right?

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      1. OT, did you read CPH post today about EU citizens who had to submit extra documents (besides their PASSPORTS!) when they were flying via Aarhus airport. I thought passport is pass to go thru ports. *scratches head*

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  2. I did! And I was baffled and also felt very lucky that I hadn’t been asked for that last time I went through.
    The Dansplanation that they needed to make sure they didn’t send anyone to the UK in error was funny/weird.

    No other country I have travelled through makes you show your passport to the police to LEAVE. The UK has an entry border check, if they were unhappy about the status of the EU citizens THEY could do extra checks, right?

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  3. @HOX: I am not sure if that video is a work of “art” (*rolls eyes*) but it sure makes me pissed since so many Danes are saying the same thing

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    1. Her attitude conforms to the Danish view of us, she’s a suitable case for treatment I would say. It’s a bit worrying really, Danes really ought to get out and about and mix a bit, their creepy inbred culture has really made them twisted.

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    2. I think it’s actually a satirical video, based on what she says on the web site. She’s parroting the arguments we hear all the time about immigration, and doing it rather well. At first I thought she was earnest as well, but it’s just really good satire.

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  4. That’s what I suspect too, Heidi. Still, people who make that kind of satire, the meaning is kinda “lost” to us :/ who is used to hearing the same rhetoric in the media and from average Danes

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